summer

Summer Boredom Busters Courtesy of Mr. Dewey's Decimals

“Mom, I’m bored.” These dreaded words tend to echo around our house more and more as summer lengthens into July and August. Often followed with a request to play video games, no matter how many times I have told them no. My resolve to help my kids embrace boredom tends to be at it’s strongest in June. But my kids are persistent and by mid-July and August, their resolve for playdates with Mario begins to make me seriously question my resistance. 

I will often prescribe a list of ideas to cure their boredom woes. Read a book. Go play outside. Would you like a chore? Rarely are my suggestions met with enthusiasm. And when it’s the 304th time I’ve suggested the same tired ideas, we all sigh at my lack of creativity.  

Recently I had an epiphany. I don’t know that it will chase the boredom from their lives permanently, but it definitely provides more options with the potential to push them away from Mario towards more creative endeavors and strengthen my resolve against video games closer to the end of July. 


Welcome Summer

Summer is fully here. For me, this means kids are home from school. It also means slower mornings, chores, vacations, baseball games, swimming pools and of course, lots of reading. This change in schedule also brings with it a lot less quiet and a lot more interruptions. 

And that translates into the need for a few small changes to the blog. It means this post is really more for me than it is for you. While I say I am telling you what to expect, in reality I am giving myself permission to let go. 

So, here is what you can expect and where you can find me this summer:

20 Ways to Keep your Kids Reading All Summer Long

In exactly one week my kids will be getting off the bus for the last time this school year. Summer break is almost here. I can't wait for the slower pace and extra reading time summer brings. 

Not all my kids agree, about the extra reading time I mean. The summer slide is a real thing, and no I’m not talking about your local park’s playground equipment. I’m talking about the tendency for young readers (especially the more reluctant ones) to fall off the reading bandwagon over the summer months. Several articles I’ve read suggest that by reading six books over the summer, you can keep your kids from losing ground on their reading skills. I don’t know about you, but that feels doable. 

If, however, getting your child to read one book, let alone six, feels like an unreachable goal, or if you are simply looking for more ways to maintain a reading culture in your house this summer, I’ve got you covered. Below is a list of 20 ways you can help your kids keep reading all summer long.